Breast Cancer Panel

Breast Cancer Panel

Breast cancer, the most common cancer in women, is a disease in which carcinomas arise from epithelial cells in lobular and duct tissues in the breast. Breast cancer affects about 1 in 8 (~12.4%) women on average over the course of their lifetime. It accounts for 1/3 of the cancers in women and in 2017, it is estimated that approximately 255,180 new cases will be diagnosed. Most cases of breast cancer occur sporadically, or without family history. However, about 5-10% of the cases are hereditary and frequently associated with ovarian cancer and other types of cancer.  Genetic testing facilitates the identification of hereditary breast cancer, alerts the patient about risks of having other cancers, empowers patients to make their medical decisions and provides information for other at-risk family members. This test analyzes 19 genes simultaneously, including both high-risk genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, STK11, PTEN, TP53) and other moderate-to-high-risk genes, which will affect the medical management based on clinical guidelines.

  • Genes (19): BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, PTEN, CDH1, STK11, ATM, AR, BARD1, BRIP1, CASP8, CHEK2, DIRAS3, ERBB2, NBN, PALB2, RAD50, RAD51C, and TGFB1
  • Test Code: 2002
  • Clinical Indication: Personal or family history suggestive of a predisposition to hereditary breast cancer.
  • Test Info Sheet: Breast Cancer Panel
  • Requisition:  General Test Requisition Form
  • Turn-Around Time: 4 Weeks
  • Preferred Specimen: 6-9 mL Whole Blood – Lavender Tube Top
  • Other Specimens: See details here
  • CPT Codes: 81211×1, 81213×1, 81321×1, 81405×3, 81406×2, 81408×1, 81479×10
    Pricing: Please contact us at (949) 916-8886 or mailto:inquries@apollogen.com
  • Methodology: Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)
  • Related Tests:
  • BRCA1 and BRCA2 Sequencing
  • iGene Cancer Panel (Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Panel)
  • References:
    1. Antoniou, A. C. et al. Common breast cancer-predisposition alleles are associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 82, 937–948 (2008).
    2. http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/statistics
    3. Frank, T. S. et al. Sequence analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2: correlation of mutations with family history and ovarian cancer risk. J. Clin. Oncol. Off. J. Am. Soc. Clin. Oncol. 16, 2417–2425 (1998).
    4. Loman, N., Johannsson, O., Kristoffersson, U., Olsson, H. & Borg, A. Family history of breast and ovarian cancers and BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in a population-based series of early-onset breast cancer. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 93, 1215–1223 (2001).
    5. Edlich, R. F. et al. Breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics: an update. J. Environ. Pathol. Toxicol. Oncol. Off. Organ Int. Soc. Environ. Toxicol. Cancer 27, 245–256 (2008).
    6. Meindl, A., Ditsch, N., Kast, K., Rhiem, K. & Schmutzler, R. K. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: new genes, new treatments, new concepts. Dtsch. Arzteblatt Int. 108, 323–330 (2011).
    7. Friedenson, B. BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathways and the risk of cancers other than breast or ovarian. MedGenMed Medscape Gen. Med. 7, 60 (2005).
    8. Walsh, T. & King, M.-C. Ten genes for inherited breast cancer. Cancer Cell 11, 103–105 (2007).
    9. Byrnes, G. B., Southey, M. C. & Hopper, J. L. Are the so-called low penetrance breast cancer genes, ATM, BRIP1, PALB2 and CHEK2, high risk for women with strong family histories? Breast Cancer Res. BCR 10, 208 (2008).
    10. Wong, M. W. et al. BRIP1, PALB2, and RAD51C mutation analysis reveals their relative importance as genetic susceptibility factors for breast cancer. Breast Cancer Res. Treat. 127, 853–859 (2011).
    11. Pennington, K. P. & Swisher, E. M. Hereditary ovarian cancer: beyond the usual suspects. Gynecol. Oncol. 124, 347–353 (2012).
    12. ACMG, “Statement on Population Screening for BRCA-1 Mutation in Ashkenazi Jewish Women”. 2001-2006.
    13. National Comprehensive Cancer Network., Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian (Version 2.2017). https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/genetics_screening.pdf. Accessed January, 2017

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