Colon Cancer Panel

Colon Cancer Panel

  • Approximately 5%, or 1 in 20, Americans will be diagnosed with cancer of the colon or rectum in their lifetime. Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer in men and women.
  • Colorectal cancer (CRC) often begins as a growth called a polyp, which may form on the inner wall of the colon or rectum. Some polyps become cancerous over time. Finding polyps early with screening tests, and removing them promptly can prevent colorectal cancer. The main risk factors of colorectal cancer are aging, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps, and a genetic syndrome, such as Lynch syndrome.
  • In general, people who are at risk of having inherited colorectal cancer and who could benefit from genetic testing may have one or more of the following red flags within their personal or family history:
  • • a strong family history of colorectal cancer and/or polyps
    • multiple primary cancers in a patient with colorectal cancer
    • several family members with colorectal cancer and/or other cancers associated with inherited cancer syndrome, such as endometrial cancer
    • early age at diagnosis of colorectal cancer
  • ApolloGen’s Colon Cancer Panel analyzes 12 critical high-risk genes that have been associated with colorectal cancer. It also covers the most common and well-described hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome (also referred to as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, Juvenile Polyposis syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Peutz-Jegher syndrome, MUTYH-associated polyposis, etc.
  • Genetic testing facilitates the identification of hereditary colon cancer syndromes, alerts the patient about risks of having other cancers, empowers patients to make their medical decisions and provides information for other at-risk family members. A molecular diagnosis of inherited colorectal syndrome will determine the most appropriate medical management recommendation for the patient, including introducing earlier and more frequent colonoscopy, extracolonic surveillance for other associated cancers or prophylactic surgery (colectomy) in certain cases, which all have been shown to improve survival rates.
  • Genes (12): APC, BMPR1A, CDH1, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, PMS2, PTEN, SMAD4, STK11, and TP53
    Test Code: 2021
    Clinical Indications:
    • Confirmation of diagnosis in patients with personal or family history suggestive of a predisposition to hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.
    • Carrier testing in asymptomatic family members of an affected/deseased proband.
    • Determine the most appropriate clinical management recommendations.
    Test Info Sheet: Colon Cancer Panel
    Requisition: Cancer Test Requisition Form
  • Turn-Around Time: 4 Weeks
    Preferred Specimen: 3-5 mL Whole Blood – Lavender Top Tube
    Other Specimens: See details here
  • CPT Codes: 81201×1, 81292×1, 81295×1, 81298×1, 81317×1, 81321×1, 81405×2, 81406×3, 81479×1
    Pricing: Please contact us at (949) 916-8886 or inquiries@apollogen.com
  • Methodology: Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)
    Related Tests:
    Breast Cancer Panel
    iGene Cancer Panel
  • References:
    1. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer, https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/index.htm, Disease Control and Prevention.
    2. Howlader N, et al. SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2013, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/ 1975 _2013/ based on November 2015 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2016.
    3. National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health. Colorectal Cancer – Health Professional version. https://www.cancer.gov/types/colorectal/hp
    4. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology, Colorectal Cancer Screening (Version 2.2016). https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/colorectal_screening. Accessed February, 2017
    5. Jasperson, K. W. Genetic testing by cancer site: colon (polyposis syndromes). Cancer J 18, 328–333 (2012).
    6. National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology, Genetic/Familial High‐Risk Assessment: Colorectal (Version 2.2016). https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/genetics_colon.pdf. Accessed January, 2017
    7. American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2017. https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/all-cancer-facts-figures/cancer-facts-figures-2017.html
    8. American Cancer Society. Colorectal Cancer Facts & Figures 2014-2016. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 2014.
    9. Jasperson, K. W., Tuohy, T. M., Neklason, D. W. & Burt, R. W. Hereditary and familial colon cancer. Gastroenterology 138, 2044–2058 (2010).

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